Immune response of earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris, Eisenia andrei and Aporrectodea tuberculata) following in situ soil exposure to atmospheric deposition from a cement factory

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1039/b301956j
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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Environmental Monitoring
Volume5
Issue5
Pages774779; # of pages: 6
Subjectenv; Plants; Cells; Hand; Calcium
AbstractIn order to reduce their energy costs, many cement plants use fuel product substitutes (old tyres and used oil). The combustion of these products generates a metal increase (e.g. Cu, Cd, Pb and Zn) in the atmospheric emissions. After their release, these elements are deposited into the environment and could eventually accumulate up to concentrations of concern. At the Saint-Laurent cement factory (Joliette, QC, Canada), maximum deposition of these elements occurs in the direction of prevailing winds (North-East). We evaluated the potential impact of these depositions upon the immune system of three earthworm species (Lumbricus terrestris, Eisenia andrei and Aporrectodea tuberculata) exposed in a natural environment. The exposure sites were 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 km downwind from the cement factory, along with an upwind reference site. The immune parameters studied were the cell viability and phagocytic potential of the immune cells (coelomocytes). For both L. terrestris and E. andrei, after 7 d exposure, none of the measured parameters showed significant differences among the sites. On the other hand, for the indigenous worm A. tuberculata, in the most exposed zone (at 0.5 km), we observed an increase in cell viability and phagocytic potential. This increase could possibly be attributed to physicochemical effects such as the alkaline pH of the soil, or alternatively, it could result from beneficial effects induced by an increased calcium supply.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Biotechnology Research Institute; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedNo
NRC number45925
NPARC number3539001
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Record identifier2add4161-7488-4329-985d-4c7f2804cea5
Record created2009-03-01
Record modified2016-05-09
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