Convenient contrast enhancement by a hole-free phase plate

Download
  1. Get@NRC: Convenient contrast enhancement by a hole-free phase plate (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.ultramic.2012.02.004
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleUltramicroscopy
ISSN0304-3991
Volume118
Pages7789; # of pages: 13
Subjectphase plate; transmission electron microscope; contrast transfer function; charging; low dose TEM; radiation damage; contrast improvement; electron beam induced charging; Zernike phase plate; electron beam induced contamination; cryo TEM
AbstractDecrease of the irradiation dose needed to obtain a desired signal-to-noise ratio can be achieved by Zernike phase-plate imaging. Here we present results on a hole-free phase plate (HFPP) design that uses the incident electron beam to define the center of the plate, thereby eliminating the need for high precision alignment and with advantages in terms of ease of fabrication. The Zernike-like phase shift is provided by a charge distribution induced by the primary beam, rather than by a hole in the film. Compared to bright-field Fresnel-mode imaging, the hole-free phase plate (HFPP) results in two- to four-fold increase in contrast, leading to a corresponding decrease in the irradiation dose required to obtain a desired signal-to-noise ratio. A local potential distribution, developed due to electron beam-induced secondary-electron emission, is the most likely mechanism responsible for the contrast-transfer properties of the HFPP.
Publication date
PublisherElsevier
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; National Institute for Nanotechnology
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21268175
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifier2b75d6ee-da07-47d3-99fd-7d2eb7d0db60
Record created2013-05-16
Record modified2016-05-09
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)