Electrochemically driven assembly of mixed dithiol bilayers via sulfur dimers

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1021/la034959m
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TypeArticle
Journal titleLangmuir
ISSN0743-7463
Volume19
Issue21
Pages89168921; # of pages: 6
AbstractWe report on the electroformation of mixed bilayers of rigid (1,4-benzenedimethanethiol) and flexible (1,6-hexanedithiol) dithiols on Au(111) from alkaline aqueous solution. These bilayers are formed by first electrodepositing a monolayer of vertically aligned dithiols. The unreacted dithiols are then oxidatively dimerized with the other dithiols, and a bilayer is formed. ACIS (ac impedance spectroscopy) measurements indicate that the monolayer of the rigid dithiol is a better substrate for dimerization than the flexible dithiol. ACIS also reveals that the electroformation of a bilayer is more complete, and the bilayer has fewer defects than one obtained through chemical incubation. Infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy provides proof for mixed-bilayer formation of the alkanedithiol with the benzenedimethanethiol having its methylene groups deuterated. The mechanism for bilayer formation via the oxidative dimerization of thiols is supported by high-resolution electron energy loss spectra of bilayers, which show a S-S stretch at 515 cm-1. Our results show that this electrochemical approach is a viable methodology for the formation of complex organic interfaces.
Publication date
PublisherAmerican Chemical Society
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences
Peer reviewedYes
Identifier10367391
NPARC number12339018
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Record identifier2b9ba878-0bb9-4dc2-87a4-1fa06edbed60
Record created2009-09-11
Record modified2017-03-15
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