A review of invasive Haemophilus influenzae disease in the Indigenous populations of North America

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1017/S0950268814000405
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TypeArticle
Journal titleEpidemiology and Infection
ISSN1469-4409
Volume142
Issue7
Pages13441354; # of pages: 11
Subjectampicillin; antibody; cefotaxime; cephalosporin derivative; Haemophilus influenzae vaccine; immunoglobulin G; rifampicin; antibiotic therapy; antibody response; bacterial virulence; chemoprophylaxis; disease predisposition; disease transmission; Haemophilus infection; Haemophilus influenzae; health care need; human; immune response; immunization; incidence; indigenous people; infection rate; invasive species; North America; post exposure prophylaxis; review; risk factor; socioeconomics
AbstractHistorically, the highest incidence rates of invasive Haemophilus influenzae disease in the world were found in North American and Australian Indigenous children. Although immunization against H. influenzae type b (Hib) led to a marked decrease in invasive Hib disease in countries where it was implemented, this disease has not been eliminated and its rates in Indigenous communities remain higher than in the general North American population. In this literature review, we examined the epidemiology of invasive H. influenzae disease in the pre-Hib vaccine era, effect of carriage on disease epidemiology, immune response to H. influenzae infection and Hib vaccination in Indigenous and Caucasian children, and the changing epidemiology after Hib conjugate vaccine has been in use for more than two decades in North America. We also explored reasons behind the continued high rates of invasive H. influenzae disease in Indigenous populations in North America. H. influenzae type a (Hia) has emerged as a significant cause of severe disease in North American Indigenous communities. More research is needed to define the genotypic diversity of Hia and the disease burden that it causes in order to determine if a Hia vaccine is required to protect the vulnerable populations. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2014.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); Human Health Therapeutics (HHT-TSH)
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21272236
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Record identifier2e361e25-98b8-401e-8295-4ad02e941e93
Record created2014-07-23
Record modified2016-05-09
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