Characterization of a partial a-amylase clone from red porgy (Pagrus pagrus): Expression during larval development

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpb.2005.11.010
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TypeArticle
Journal titleComparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part B: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Volume143
Issue2
Pages209218; # of pages: 10
Subjectred porgy; Pagrus pagrus; a-amylase expression; In situ hybridization; RT-PCR; development; digestive physiology; fish larvae; pancreas
AbstractA partial ?-amylase cDNA was isolated from red porgy (Pagrus pagrus, Teleostei: Sparidae) and its tissue specific expression during larval development was examined. The cDNA was 949 bp long and showed 90% identity with other fish amylases. A 545 bp fragment was used to study amylase expression using in situ hybridization and RT-PCR techniques. Both methods showed a similar pattern: high and relatively constant expression for the first 30 days after hatching (dah), subsequently decreasing until the end of the experiment at 60 dah. The goal of this work was to extend the existing knowledge of the functionality of larval fish digestive systems and to provide new information about ?-amylase gene expression.
Publication date
PublisherElsevier
Copyright notice© 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Institute for Marine Biosciences; Human Health Therapeutics
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number1494
NPARC number3538455
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Record identifier2ecf0d31-5f4a-4058-a958-d23bc77b4978
Record created2009-03-01
Record modified2016-05-09
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