The oxygen index on soot production in propane diffusion flames

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/00102202.2014.883226
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TypeArticle
Journal titleCombustion Science and Technology
ISSN1563-521X
Volume186
Issue4-May
Pages504517; # of pages: 14
SubjectDiffusion; Heat flux; Oxygen; Propane; Soot; Volume fraction; Classical theory; Diffusion Flame; Effect of oxygen; Radiative heat fluxes; Soot formations; Soot volume fraction; Vertical distributions; Volumetric concentrations; Dust
AbstractAn experimental study of the effect of oxygen index (OI) on soot formation in laminar coflow propane diffusion flames is presented. The OI was defined as the oxygen volumetric concentration in the oxidizer flow, O2/(O 2+N2), which was varied from 21% to 37%. The influence of the OI was quantified by means of three variables: the flame height, the soot volume fraction, and the vertical distribution of radiative heat flux. The flame height was based on CH* spontaneous emission and found to vary inversely with the OI, following the classical theory of Roper. As the OI increases, the rates of soot growth and soot oxidation are enhanced, and the maximum soot volume fraction and the peak of integrated soot volume fraction also increase. Moreover, the evolution of the peak of radiative heat flux and the maximum soot volume fraction are found to follow the same evolution with the OI. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); Measurement Science and Standards (MSS-SME)
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21272192
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Record identifier2ed648f5-1336-49c6-bb75-c9eaf3b721f2
Record created2014-07-23
Record modified2016-05-09
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