A Star-forming shock front in radio galaxy 4C+41.17 resolved with laser-assisted adaptive optics spectroscopy

Download
  1. Get@NRC: A Star-forming shock front in radio galaxy 4C+41.17 resolved with laser-assisted adaptive optics spectroscopy (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1088/0004-6256/148/1/10
AuthorSearch for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleAstronomical Journal
ISSN0004-6256
Volume148
Issue1
Article number10
Subjectactive galaxies; galaxy jets; galaxy nuclei; starburst; adaptive optics
AbstractNear-infrared integral-field spectroscopy of redshifted [O III], Hβ, and optical continuum emission from the z = 3.8 radio galaxy 4C+41.17 is presented, obtained with the laser-guide-star adaptive optics facility on the Gemini North telescope. Employing a specialized dithering technique, a spatial resolution of 0″.10, or 0.7 kpc, is achieved in each spectral element, with a velocity resolution of ∼70 km s-1. Spectra similar to local starbursts are found for bright knots coincident in archival Hubble Space Telescope ( HST) rest-frame ultraviolet images, which also allows a key line diagnostic to be mapped together with new kinematic information. There emerges a clearer picture of the nebular emission associated with the jet in 8.3 GHz and 15 GHz Very Large Array maps, closely tied to a Lyα-bright shell-shaped structure seen with HST. This supports a previous interpretation of that arc tracing a bow shock, inducing ∼1010-11 M⊙ star formation regions that comprise the clumpy broadband optical/ultraviolet morphology near the core.
Publication date
PublisherIOP Publishing
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; National Science Infrastructure
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21272880
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifier2efe6e94-573a-4969-bf06-70c445884f2e
Record created2014-12-03
Record modified2016-05-09
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)