Nanopillar niobium oxides as support structures for oxygen reduction electrocatalysts

Download
  1. Get@NRC: Nanopillar niobium oxides as support structures for oxygen reduction electrocatalysts (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.electacta.2012.08.005
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleElectrochimica Acta
ISSN0013-4686
Volume85
Pages492500; # of pages: 9
SubjectGlancing angle deposition; Niobium oxide; Oxygen reduction reaction; Catalyst support
AbstractMetal oxides such as niobium oxides have been demonstrated as alternative support materials for Pt and non-precious metal catalysts in fuel cells. High surface area and columnar niobium oxide catalyst support structures were produced by the glancing angle deposition (GLAD) technique on 5 mm diameter glassy carbon disks. The columnar structures have lengths of about 500 nm, diameters of 50 nm and an areal density of about 10^9 cm−². Annealing under different gas mixtures (Ar/H2) led to the formation of various oxides (Nb2O5, NbO2, or NbO + NbO2). Pt catalyst, with a loading of 0.1 mgPt cm−², was deposited onto these structures by magnetron sputter deposition. Rotating disk electrode characterization of the samples, performed in 0.1M HClO4 electrolyte at room temperature, revealed surface enhancement factors of up to 11 and oxygen reduction specific activities of ≥1 mA cm−²Pt at 0.9 V (vs. RHE). The impact of annealing on Nb-O phase formation, conductivity, oxygen reduction activity and stability are discussed.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationSecurity and Disruptive Technologies; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
IdentifierS0013468612012790
NPARC number21268736
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifier2f0cef6e-2dd0-4796-bb48-e229a8677ccd
Record created2013-11-12
Record modified2016-05-09
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)