Selection of chemotactic adipose-derived stem cells using a microfluidic gradient generator

Download
  1. (PDF, 737 KB)
  2. Get@NRC: Selection of chemotactic adipose-derived stem cells using a microfluidic gradient generator (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1039/C4RA12863J
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleRSC Advances
ISSN2046-2069
Volume5
Issue9
Pages63326339
AbstractStem cells hold great promise for treating various degenerative diseases and conditions. However, the outcomes of preclinical and clinical cell therapy studies are still not close to our expectation. We believe that the unsatisfactory outcomes of cell therapy are at least partially due to insufficient homing of implanted stem cells into target organs and the use of heterogeneous cell populations for cell therapy. Therefore, there is a need to develop an effective guiding technique for stem cells to migrate to the target organs and to isolate effective stem cell populations. Toward this direction, we have previously demonstrated chemotaxis of rat adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) to a well-defined gradient of epidermal growth factor (EGF) using a microfluidic device. In the current study, we further developed a microfluidics-based method for selecting chemotactic ASCs to EGF. This method integrates cell patterning, chemotaxis and cell extraction on a single microfluidic gradient-generating device. Post-extraction analysis confirmed the higher chemotactic migration of the extracted cells to EGF. Consistently, the extracted chemotactic ASCs shows up-regulated surface expression of the EGF receptor and its downstream signaling event upon EGF stimulation. The results suggest that our method provides a new effective approach for the selection of specific stem cell populations. It is also expected that the use of the selectively extracted stem cells could enhance stem cell homing to target organs and consequently improve the outcome of cell therapy.
Publication date
PublisherRoyal Society of Chemistry
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationMedical Devices; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number23001604
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifier3039e115-086c-46b1-89a1-b836cdb08b31
Record created2017-03-09
Record modified2017-03-09
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)