Solar heat gains through windows in Canada

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Journal titlePaper, Division of Building Research, National Research Council Canada
Subjectsolar heating; solar radiation; heat gains; windows; Heat performance
AbstractNet heat gains through windows, defined as the difference between the solar energy admitted through the window and its conduction heat loss, were calculated and presented in Tables 1 to 39. Calculations were performed in detail on an hourly basis using measured weather parameters for 1970-71 for 13 Canadian locations and three window types. The monthly total values of the solar radiation incident on the window, the solar gain through, the conduction heat loss and the net heat gain, as well as the total of these values over the heating season (October 1 to April 30), are all given in Tables 1 to 39 in units of MJ/m[2] of window area. Net heat gain values can be used during the early stages of a building design to assess the potential benefits of passive solar aspects of the building. It should be noted, however, that values listed in Tables 1 to 39 are the calculated net gains and not the actual useful gains. These values do not take into account factors such as shading, room net reflectance, building thermal storage capabilities or space overheating. A basis for a method is outlined in this report which uses these calculated net gain values to calculate useful passive solar contribution taking into account all the parameters involved, that is building load, glazing area, storage mass and space comfort.
Publication date
PublisherNational Research Council Canada. Division of Building Research
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedNo
NRC number18674
NPARC number20375148
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Record identifier309dcb37-6d6b-481c-921a-fa51fa4e9a5b
Record created2012-07-23
Record modified2016-10-04
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