Punching shear behaviour of externally prestressed concrete slabs

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1061/(ASCE)ST.1943-541X.0000283
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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Structural Engineering
Volume137
Issue1
Pages100108; # of pages: 9
SubjectAnalysis, bridge deck, design, fibre reinforced concrete, finite element, prestressed, punching, shear, slabs; Fibre-reinforced polymers (FRP)
AbstractThe use of externally post-tensioned fibre reinforced concrete decks in highway bridge structures is seen as a viable option in the move towards the design and construction of high-performance structures. However, with the thin unreinforced deck slabs that may result, punching shear is a potential concern. An experimental program is described in which the punching shear behaviour of externally prestressed slabs is investigated, both with plain and fibre reinforced concrete specimens. Results indicate that significant improvements in strength, ductility, energy absorption and non-brittleness of failure can be achieved with fibre reinforcement. Nonlinear finite element analysis procedures are used to model the specimens, and reasonably accurate simulation of behaviour are obtained. Design code procedures are found to be unconservative in estimating the punching shear strength of these elements, whereas a commonly used analytical model is found to be overly conservative.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number53619
21362
NPARC number20374216
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Record identifier31d997e2-2f3c-426a-b706-5e011acec762
Record created2012-07-23
Record modified2016-05-09
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