Chemometric analysis of attenuated total reflectance infrared spectral data for quantitation of immunoglobulin G in equine plasma and serum

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.chemolab.2016.05.020
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TypeArticle
Journal titleChemometrics and Intelligent Laboratory Systems
ISSN0169-7439
Volume156
Pages108114
SubjectMultivariate calibration; Principal component regression; Attenuated total reflectance; Infrared spectroscopy; Equine; Immunoglobulin G
AbstractImmunoglobulin G (IgG) is a crucial antibody to protect animals from invasion by microorganisms. Although there exist several methods in veterinary medicine to measure IgG levels for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, these methods suffer from various weaknesses. Infrared (IR) spectroscopy coupled with chemometric tools such as principal component regression has been widely employed for the measurement of compounds in mixtures with the advantages that include simplicity, quickness and low test cost. Earlier investigation for IgG assay based on transmission IR spectroscopy using laboratory grade equipment has been conducted, but it is not readily transferrable to the clinic, hospital or small laboratory setting. More robust attenuated total reflectance (ATR) IR spectroscopy platforms have recently been developed for a range of roles in the field. This study investigated the possibility of using ATR-IR spectroscopy to determine the IgG concentrations in foal serum and adult horse plasma samples. The results of this work showed that immunoglobulin G concentrations predicted by ATR-IR spectroscopy with chemometric analysis had good agreement with those obtained from the radial immunodiffusion (RID) reference method. The precision of this approach was most compatible to RID method when the IgG concentration was high, but poorer for lower IgG concentrations. It was also showed that building a united calibration model for serum and plasma samples is likely. The results of this work indicate that ATR-IR spectroscopy coupled with chemometric analysis is a promising technique to measure the equine serum and plasma IgG concentrations in the veterinary clinical or hospital environment.
Publication date
PublisherElsevier
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
IdentifierS0169743916301307
NPARC number23000312
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Record identifier32017a66-0547-4664-9570-93dd6aa7e6fd
Record created2016-07-06
Record modified2016-07-06
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