Further studies on the analysis of DSP toxin profiles in galician mussels

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1021/jf971043a
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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
ISSN0021-8561
1520-5118
Volume47
Issue2
Pages618621
SubjectDSP toxins; okadaic acid; DTX2; DTX3; liquid chromatography; fluorescence; mass spectrometry
AbstractFurther studies on mussel samples from Galicia, Spain, have revealed the presence of okadaic acid (OA), dinophysistoxin 2 (DTX2), and the fatty acid acyl esters of both of these toxins as the “DTX3” complex. Measurements were performed with an improved in situ method for the formation of 9-anthryldiazomethane (ADAM) derivatives followed by liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. Base hydrolysis of DTX3 toxins gave free OA and DTX2, which were determined following ADAM derivatization. Results were confirmed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry analyses, and in most of the samples, free DTX2 was the most abundant toxin. However, the OA/DTX2 ratio in the DTX3 conjugated form was different, with OA being the most abundant in all cases. This difference could be due to different rates of metabolism of OA and DTX2 to the acyl esters or due to contamination of the shellfish by the two toxins at different points in time, resulting in less acyl ester formation for one toxin versus the other. The second possibility would be reasonable if two different source organisms were producing the toxins.
Publication date
PublisherAmerican Chemical Society
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Marine Biosciences; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number23000946
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Record identifier339aafca-a308-4ddf-b8d4-528ff1d1093d
Record created2016-11-21
Record modified2016-11-21
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