Relation between indoor air formaldehyde concentrations and ventilation rates for a group of sixteen new houses

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ConferenceProc. 78th Annual Meet. Air Pollution Control Assoc.: 1985-06, Detriutm MI, USA
Subjectformaldehyde; design criteria; ventilation; air flow; housing; Ventilation
AbstractFormaldehyde gas has been identified as a potential health problem in new "airtight" houses. This paper is directed to residential HVAC system designers and building code officials who must have design methods for predicting indoor formaldehyde levels. This study involved measuring indoor HCOH levels and ventilation rates for sixteen nominally identical houses and used a simple steady state one compartment mass balance model to relate these two parameters. The calculated net source strengths suggest that, for these residences, the major interior source of HCOH was the building itself. The data were well correlated (correlation coefficients > 0.8) and most of the scatter in the data could be accounted for by temperature and humidity variations. The indoor relative humidity was not well correlated to the ventilation rate, hence the traditional method of controlling ventilation via an indoor humidistat must be questioned. The bedroom HCOH levels were significantly higher than the living room levels, indicating that design of the air distribution system must be given careful consideration.
Publication date
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number24951
NPARC number20375720
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Record identifier33d3975a-4f4f-437e-bfa2-55825611378f
Record created2012-07-23
Record modified2016-05-09
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