Nanostructural changes due to the removal of water from hydrated portland cement and other inorganic hydrates

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TypeArticle
Journal titleRecent Research Developments in Materials Science - RESEARCH SIGNPOST, INDIA
Volume3
Pages117124; # of pages: 8
SubjectCement/Concrete
AbstractThe removal of water from Portland cement hydrates results in irreversible volume changes that are concomitant to nanoscale changes in the structure of these materials. The flow of helium into spaces of nanodimensions vacated by water enables estimates of the density of the water and changes in solid volume, surface area, and pore structure descriptors. Influences regarding the nature and behavior of the layered calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H) in Portland cement paste can be made from quantities derived from helium inflow measurements on drying experiments. Helium inflow measurements on other more well defined layered silicates e.g. sepiolite have provided evidence that these techniques are sensitive to the structural events that occur on the incremental removal of water. In addition study of the hydration of non-Portland cements (magnesium oxychloride and magnesium oxysulfate) and gypsum has established confidence in the physico-chemical and physico-mechanical interpretation of the quantities estimated by the inflow characteristics of CuSO4. 5H2O reinforce the general conclusions drawn for Portland cement systems.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number44772
14119
NPARC number20386440
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Record identifier361bfa18-e6df-400a-accf-29923a4466d5
Record created2012-07-25
Record modified2016-05-09
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