Simulation of flow in a continuous galvanizing bath: Part II. Transient aluminum distribution resulting from ingot addition

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1007/s11663-004-0107-4
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TypeArticle
Journal titleMetallurgical and Materials Transactions B
Volume35B
Issue1
Pages171178; # of pages: 8
AbstractThe coupled phenomena of momentum, heat, and mass transfer were simulated in order to predict and to better understand the generation and movement of intermetallic dross particles within certain regions of a typical galvanizing bath. Solutions for the temperature and aluminum concentration can be correlated with the solubility limits of aluminum (Al) and iron (Fe) to determine the amount of precipitated aluminum in the form of Fe2Al5 top dross. Software developed by the Industrial Materials Institute of the National Research Council of Canada (IMI-NRC), including k-ε turbulence modeling for heat and mass transfer, was adapted for the simulation of a sequence of operating parameters. Each case was modeled over a period of 1 hour, taking into account an ingot-melting period followed by a nonmelting period. The presence of an ingot significantly changes the temperature distribution and also results in important variations in the local aluminum concentration, since the makeup ingot has a higher aluminum concentration. The simulation showed that during the ingot melting, the total aluminum concentration is higher at the ingot side of the bath than at the strip exit side. The region below the ingot presents the highest aluminum concentration, whereas lower aluminum concentrations were found in the region above the sink roll, between the strip and the free surface. It was shown that precipitates form near the ingot surface because this region is surrounded by a solution at 420 °C, which is lower than the average bath temperature of 460 °C. When no ingot is present, the total aluminum concentration becomes much more uniform and decreases with time at a constant rate, depending on the coating thickness. This information is of major significance in the prediction of the formation of dross particles, which can cause defects on the coated product.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Industrial Materials Institute; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number46345
NPARC number18487245
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Record identifier36276e48-439b-44de-be0a-27de024cc60e
Record created2011-10-11
Record modified2016-05-09
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