Study of friction: measurement, analysis and practical implications for the wheel/rail contact

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TypeArticle
Proceedings titleProceedings: 8th International Conference on Contact Mechanics and Wear of Rail, Wheel Systems: 15th - 18th September 2009, Firenze, Italy
Conference8th International Conference on Contact Mechanics and Wear of Rail, Wheel Systems: 15th - 18th September 2009, Firenze, Italy
AbstractThrough a range of increasingly featured models of wheel-rail contact, vehicles and track it is possible to model in great detail the vehicle/track performance. But one aspect of the wheel/rail interaction that remains poorly understood and more poorly applied in models is the traction-creepage characteristic. Most models depend on the theory of Kalker, one that applies to “scrupulously clean surfaces”. A simple scaling factor approach to the Kalker model is available in many of the existing dynamics codes but is poorly understood and often not used. Even in the UK, with more experience than most countries in understanding prevailing friction conditions, consistent peak friction measurements of 0.23 +/- about 0.05 standard deviation are co-opted by the use of a 0.45 value in many experiments because the larger value gives ”best agreement with test force measurements and observations”. We report on a new instrument for field measurements of the traction creepage characteristic based on lateral creepage, and then show some early measurement values and compare them with those measured by a standard Salient hand pushed tribometer. Through dynamic modeling, the implications of the traction creepage relationship on forces, wear and vehicle stability are explored.
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PublisherAB Ed
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Centre for Surface Transportation Technology; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number23000290
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Record identifier37d072e5-e09a-4255-a92c-5b82c698b073
Record created2016-07-05
Record modified2016-12-02
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