Invertebrate and sediment characteristics of the Starrs Point lower intertidal region: final report of Federal Summer Job Corps project 16-01-003

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.4224/23000795
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TypeTechnical Report
Series titleInvestigation on the ecology of the Bay of Fundy
Physical description147 p.
SubjectBay of Fundy; Scots Bay; Minas Basin; Starrs Point; invertebrates; Great Blue Heron; Corophium volutator; Ardea herodias
AbstractThe present study was undertaken to describe the faunal and sediment characteristics of the lower intertidal region of the Starrs Point mudbar. Our objectives were as follows: 1) to determine the numerical abundance and distribution of invertebrates; 2) to investigate various aspects of the biology of the major food species, Corophium volutator; 3) to describe coarse and fine sediment particle distribution; 4) to determine the water and organic content of sediments at the same location; 5) to establish relationships between invertebrates and sediments. A final aspect of this project deals with the breeding and foraging ecology of the Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) in the southern Minas Basin.
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PublisherNational Research Council Canada. Atlantic Regional Laboratory
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada
NoteInvestigations on the ecology of the Bay of Fundy: a series of projects on the enumeration and interactions of the flora, fauna, chemistry, hydrology and geology of the Bay of Fundy with an emphasis on the Minas Basin and Scots Bay; Final Report of Federal Summer Job Corps project #16-01-003.
Peer reviewedNo
NPARC number23000795
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Record identifier384c77eb-a45e-4f47-b899-d639e21a0220
Record created2016-10-06
Record modified2016-10-07
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