Techniques for estimating the energy consumption of houses

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ConferenceTo Build and Take Care of What We Have Built with Limited Resources : Proceedings of the 9th CIB Congress, v. 3a, Energy Technology and Construction: 1983, Stockholm, Sweden
Pages201212; # of pages: 12
Subjectheating (process); heat transfer; heating equipment; residential facilities; thermal properties; heating energy; calculation methods; Energy efficiency
AbstractThe evaluation of a house design requires a method for estimating the effect of various design features on the heating energy requirements. Such a method must account for the following: heat loss, primarily by conduction, through the exterior envelope; heat loss due to exchange of indoor air and outdoor air; heat loss to the earth through basement walls and floor; heat gain from occupants and appliances; solar heat gain through windows; and the performance characteristics of the heating system. Although a number of computer programs have been developed to simulate the thermal behaviour of a house, simpler methods are more appropriate for use as design tools, or for evaluating house designs for building code or labelling applications. Simple methods sacrifice some accuracy, particularly when the effects of heat storage and variations in room temperature become significant, but they are adequate for many practical applications. Recent research at the National Research Council of Canada has resulted in improved methods for calculating below-grade losses and the utilization of solar gains through windows that can be incorporated into such calculation procedures.
Publication date
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number23438
NPARC number20375496
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Record identifier38b29ec6-2d31-4754-a494-83f7c8b5e227
Record created2012-07-23
Record modified2016-05-09
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