A New procedure for evaluating the time domain boundary influence matrix of unbounded media

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AuthorSearch for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleComputers and Structures
ISSN0045-7949
Volume34
Issue6
Pages843853; # of pages: 11
Subjectfinite element method; Vibrations; méthode des éléments finis
AbstractThe finite element method can only deal with finite domains with well defined boundaries. For dynamic problems involving unbounded media, the boundaries of the finite model distort the real physical behaviour of the problem if they remain untreated. For many problems it is possible to formulate so-called silent boundary conditions which perfectly simulate the effect of the truncated unbounded medium. Unfortunately, most of these conditions are properly formulated in the frequency domain. The present paper introduces a new procedure which employs these frequency-dependent boundary conditions to calculate the time domain influence matrix of the truncated unbounded medium. This matrix, which was introduced in a previous publication, is used to calculate the reflection-free response of the truncation boundary one time step ahead of the present time station. The known boundary response is then used as a prescribed condition for the finite model. A one-dimensional example with a frequency-dependent boundary condition si presented to examine the effectiveness of the new procedure. Two other silent boundary conditions formulated directly in the time domain are also examined.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
IdentifierIRC-P-1656
NRC number31708
1993
NPARC number20377155
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Record identifier396d0639-fe52-401f-84f4-33d388057a9d
Record created2012-07-24
Record modified2016-05-09
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