Compressive Strengths of 2 Inch Cubes of Types S and N Mortars

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Journal titleBuilding Research Note
Subjectmortar; compressive strength; field tests; construction sites; laboratory tests; sand; air entraining agents; water cement ratios; Mortar
AbstractI. TYPE S MORTAR: 1. Satisfactory curing results are obtained when mortar cubes are molded on the construction site, stored overnight in polyethylene bags, and taken into the laboratory at 20-24 hours for normal curing. 2. Field values substantially higher (62%) than the 1800 psi requirement for Type S mortar are attributed to the use of minimum amounts of sand in the mix. 3. Field values closer to the design requirements could have been obtained with a design mix established by a pre-construction laboratory evaluation. 4. The presence of an air-entraining material in the masonry mortar mix did not have any noticeable effect on strength values. 5. A 9% reduction in the weight per bag of Portland cement was not significantly reflected in reduced strength values. 6. 28 day tests were of no practical value on this project where 1 storey was completed every 4 1/2 days. II. TYPE N MORTAR There are wide variations among individual compressive strength values for cubes of Type N mortar from the field. 2. The variations in values are caused by a number of factors. 3. Field tests for moisture content and cementitious material to aggregate ratio in plastic mortar show some promise as quality control tests for on-site use.
Publication date
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedNo
NRC number1646
NPARC number20377560
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Record identifier3a22f7c6-ec56-40e8-aa6b-2b79c6e2c80a
Record created2012-07-24
Record modified2016-05-09
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