Impact of UV and peracetic acid disinfection on the prevalence of virulence and antimicrobial resistance genes in uropathogenic escherichia coli in wastewater effluents

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1128/AEM.00418-14
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TypeArticle
Journal titleApplied and Environmental Microbiology
ISSN0099-2240
Volume80
Issue12
Pages36563666; # of pages: 11
SubjectEffluents; Escherichia coli; Genes; Microorganisms; Pathogens; Population statistics; Wastewater treatment; Activated sludge; Antimicrobial resistances; Biofiltration process; Municipal wastewaters; Uropathogenic Escherichia coli; Virulence factors; Wastewater discharge; Wastewater effluents; Disinfection
AbstractWastewater discharges may increase the populations of pathogens, including Escherichia coli, and of antimicrobial-resistant strains in receiving waters. This study investigated the impact of UV and peracetic acid (PAA) disinfection on the prevalence of virulence and antimicrobial resistance genes in uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the most abundant E. coli pathotype in municipal wastewaters. Laboratory disinfection experiments were conducted on wastewater treated by physicochemical, activated sludge, or biofiltration processes; 1,766 E. coli isolates were obtained for the evaluation. The target disinfection level was 200 CFU/100 ml, resulting in UV and PAA doses of 7 to 30 mJ/cm2 and 0.9 to 2.0 mg/liter, respectively. The proportions of UPECs were reduced in all samples after disinfection, with an average reduction by UV of 55% (range, 22% to 80%) and by PAA of 52% (range, 11% to 100%). Analysis of urovirulence genes revealed that the decline in the UPEC populations was not associated with any particular virulence factor. A positive association was found between the occurrence of urovirulence and antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs). However, the changes in the prevalence of ARGs in potential UPECs were different following disinfection, i.e., UV appears to have had no effect, while PAA significantly reduced the ARG levels. Thus, this study showed that both UV and PAA disinfections reduced the proportion of UPECs and that PAA disinfection also reduced the proportion of antimicrobial resistance gene-carrying UPEC pathotypes in municipal wastewaters.
Publication date
PublisherAmerican Society for Microbiology
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; Energy, Mining and Environment; Human Health Therapeutics
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21272885
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Record identifier3a4849cf-2ce2-4bbe-80ee-9d5abceb880c
Record created2014-12-03
Record modified2016-05-09
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