Strongly magnetic iron nanoparticles improve the fiagnosis of small tumours in the reticuloendothelial system by magnetic resonance imaging

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0056572
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TypeArticle
Journal titlePLoS ONE
ISSN1932-6203
Volume8
Issue2
Article numbere56572
Subjectsuperparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle; animal cell; animal experiment; animal model; article; breast cancer; cancer cell; controlled study; diagnostic accuracy; diagnostic test accuracy study; image analysis; image display; in vivo study; lymph node metastasis; micrometastasis; mouse; nonhuman; nuclear magnetic resonance imaging; outcome assessment; reticuloendothelial neoplasm; sensitivity and specificity; spleen; tumor diagnosis; tumor localization; Animals; Breast Neoplasms; Cell Line, Tumor; Contrast Media; Female; Humans; Iron; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Magnetite Nanoparticles; Metal Nanoparticles; Mice; Mononuclear Phagocyte System
AbstractDespite advances in non-invasive medical imaging, accurate nodal staging of malignancy continues to rely on surgery. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP) with lymphotropic qualities have shown some promise as contrast agents for MRI of the lymph nodes, but recent large-scale studies failed to show consistent detection of tumours below 5 mm. Herein we compare imaging of splenic and lymph node tissue using iron/iron oxide core/shell nanoparticles (Fe NP) that have superior magnetic qualities to IONP, to determine whether improved negative contrast in T2-weighted MRI can enhance the diagnosis of small tumours in the reticuloendothelial system. To provide an in vivo pre-clinical model of human lymph node micrometastases, breast cancer cells were injected into the spleens of mice, providing localised areas of tumour growth. MR images of groups of tumour-bearing and sham-treated animals were generated using a 1.5 T imaging system and analysed by two independent, blinded radiologists. Fe NP improved the sensitivity and specificity of MRI when compared to IONP, enabling accurate detection of tumours as small as 1-3 mm. The use of Fe NP as contrast agents have the potential to improve the diagnostic accuracy of MRI in cancer patients, leading to more rapid and effective treatment. © 2013 Ferguson et al.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); NRC Institute for Biodiagnostics (IBD-IBD)
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21269954
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Record identifier3a6d9115-a203-4320-b743-c3a79c46e657
Record created2013-12-13
Record modified2016-05-09
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