Comparison of free α-tocopherol and α-tocopheryl acetate as sources of vitamin E in rats and humans

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1007/BF02536201
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TypeArticle
Journal titleLipids
ISSN0024-4201
Volume23
Issue9
Pages834840; # of pages: 7
Subjectalpha tocopherol; human; human experiment; intestine absorption; nonhuman; rat; Animal; Biological Availability; Comparative Study; Human; Mass Fragmentography; Methods; Rats; Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Tissue Distribution; Vitamin E
AbstractThe uptake of α-tocopherol from 2 R,4′R,8′R-α-tocopherol and 2 R,4′R,8′R-α-tocopheryl acetate has been compared in rats and humans. The two forms of vitamin E were compared simultaneously in each subject (rat and human) by using a combination of deuterium-substitution and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to distinguish and measure the competitive uptake of α-tocopherol from an orally ingested mixture of the acetate and the free phenol forms. When rats were dosed in a manner analogous to that used in traditional bioassays, i.e., providing the two forms of vitamin E one daily in tocopherol-stripped corn oil for four successive days immediately prior to sacrifice, the net uptake of α-tocopherol from the free phenol form was only half that from the acetate. This result is consistent with the greater activity of the acetate that had been observed previously in bioassays. However, when the two forms of tocopherol were intubated into rats as a single dose mixed in with an aqueous bolus of standard laboratory diet, the amount of α-tocopherol taken up from the free form after 24 hr was very similar to that derived from the acetate. In five adult humans, competitive uptake studies of the two forms after a single dose taken with a meal showed that the amount of α-tocopherol from the free phenol form was equal to that from the acetate in plasma and red blood cells. These findings illustrate the value and potential of using deuterium-substituted α-tocopherol and GC-MS in evaluating the effectiveness of different forms of vitamin E in human studies. The results also stress the need for caution in using data obtained from animal bioassays when considering comparative human nutritional standards. © 1988 American Oil Chemists' Society.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC)
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21276463
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Record identifier3b75f57e-1f90-401a-ae4e-50fddd3343a0
Record created2015-10-13
Record modified2016-05-09
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