Regulation of hepatic cytochrome P-450 durIng Infectious disease

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1139/y90-119
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TypeArticle
Journal titleCanadian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology = Revue canadienne de physiologie et pharmacologie
ISSN0008-4212
1205-7541
Volume68
Issue6
Pages777781
Subjectcytochrome P-450; drug metabolism; mixed function oxidase; interferon; viral infection
AbstractDuring episodes of infectious disease the mixed function oxidase system is depressed and the capacity of the liver to metabolize drags can be compromised in both animals and humans. The depression that occurs during viral infections is mediated via the production of interferon. This action of interferon requires the synthesis of an intermediate protein(s) yet to be identified. Using an oligonucleotide probe for a unique sequence in cytochrome P-450LAω we have now shown that the mRNA for this isozyme is depressed following the administration of interferon inducers. The magnitude in the loss of mRNA corresponds to the magnitude of the loss in the levels of this isozyme. This depression is observed within 6 h of interferon exposure. It is concluded that the decrease in drag metabolism during viral infections is caused by an interferon-mediated loss in mRNA and subsequent cytochrome P-450 synthesis in the liver.
Publication date
PublisherNational Research Council Canada Research Press
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
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This is a non-NRC publication

"Non-NRC publications" are publications authored by NRC employees prior to their employment by NRC.

NPARC number23000940
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Record identifier3dcff687-239b-4400-9c0c-f848c08f6ddd
Record created2016-11-18
Record modified2016-11-18
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