Ice accretion measurements on an airfoil and wedge in mixed-phase conditions

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Proceedings titleSAE Technical Papers
ConferenceSAE 2015 International Conference on Icing of Aircraft, Engines, and Structures, June 22-25, 2015, Prague, Czech Republic
Article number2015-01-2116
SubjectIcing; Ice detection; Test facilities; Test procedures
AbstractThis paper presents measurements of ice accretion shape and surface temperature from ice-crystal icing experiments conducted jointly by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada. The data comes from experiments performed at NRC's Research Altitude Test Facility (RATFac) in 2012. The measurements are intended to help develop models of the ice-crystal icing phenomenon associated with engine ice-crystal icing. Ice accretion tests were conducted using two different airfoil models (a NACA 0012 and wedge) at different velocities, temperatures, and pressures although only a limited set of permutations were tested. The wedge airfoil had several tests during which its surface was actively cooled. The ice accretion measurements included leading-edge thickness for both airfoils. The wedge and one case from the NACA 0012 model also included 2D cross-section profile shapes. Ice growth rate at mid-span and, in some cases, along the entire icing surface is reported. The airfoils had thermocouples embedded on model surfaces. Temperature measurements from select cases, including one with edge heaters activated on the model, are presented.
Publication date
PublisherSAE International
AffiliationAerospace; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number23000063
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Record identifier3ef95d2e-aae9-416f-90a9-472b7706d925
Record created2016-06-01
Record modified2016-06-01
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