Applications of chemical vapor generation in non-tetrahydroborate media to analytical atomic spectrometry

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1039/c003483e
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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Analytical Atomic Spectrometry
ISSN0267-9477
1364-5544
Volume25
Issue8
Pages1217
AbstractChemical vapor generation (CVG) using tetrahydroborate(III) remains the most popular and successful derivatization procedure enabling gaseous sample introduction into analytical atomic spectrometers that are routinely used for the determination of trace and ultratrace amounts of hydride-forming elements as well as Cd and Hg. The number of elements amenable to tetrahydroborate(III)-derivatization has recently been extensively enlarged. Despite its many obvious advantages, drawbacks remain, such as significant interferences from transition metals. Consequently, many alternative approaches have been developed to overcome these shortcomings and to further expand the suite of elements amenable to CVG for sample introduction. This article reviews these non-tetrahydroborate-based approaches, including photochemical vapor generation (photo-CVG), borane complexes CVG, alkylation based on Grignard reactions and derivatization with NaBEt4, cold vapor generation with SnCl2, halide generation, electrochemical hydride generation, oxide generation, and generation of volatile chelates. Special attention is given to two newly developed CVG approaches: photo-CVG and reduction in the presence of cyanoborohydrides.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for National Measurement Standards; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21277188
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Record identifier40a428a9-b42b-44ae-a70a-22aef0b7ecbe
Record created2016-01-05
Record modified2016-05-09
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