Measurements of spatial and temporal variations in ice impact pressures

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TypeArticle
Proceedings titleProceedings of the 23rd International Conference on Port and Ocean Engineering under Arctic Conditions, June 14-18, 2015, Trondheim, Norway
Series titleProceedings
ConferenceThe 23rd International Conference on Port and Ocean Engineering under Arctic Conditions, June 14-18, 2015, Trondheim, Norway
ISBN0376-6756
AbstractThis paper presents results of laboratory experiments involving a 1 m diameter ice cone colliding with an instrumented panel (Impact Module). The tests were performed using a double pendulum apparatus that provided high impact energy. Images taken with a high speed camera at 500 fps from within the Impact Module provide information about the true contact area and pressure distribution during the collision. The acquired images were translated into pressure distributions using a specifically developed software routine. These data are compared to the output of a separate pressure sensor located in the centre of the Impact Module. The images show increasing contact area as the collision proceeds and capture sudden losses of area as ice fracture and spalling occurred. Observations such as significant spalling events in the vicinity of the central pressure sensor are also reflected in its recordings. The results provide maps of the temporal and spatial variations in contact pressure, contact area and force as an ice impact progresses at speeds typical of impacts that might occur with icebreaking ships.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationOcean, Coastal and River Engineering; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC numberOCRE-PR-2015-011
NPARC number21277575
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Record identifier40c4b939-d54a-4ab6-8452-4c5575c797cb
Record created2016-04-20
Record modified2016-05-09
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