Comparison of chloride- and hydride-generation for quantitation of germanium by headspace solid-phase microextraction-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1007/s00216-002-1402-z
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TypeArticle
Journal titleAnalytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry
ISSN1618-2642
Volume373
IssueAugust 8
Pages849855; # of pages: 7
AbstractChloride- and hydride-generation headspace solid-phase microextraction (SPME) techniques have been compared for the detection of trace amounts of germanium by inductively coupled plasma time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ICP–TOFMS). The conditions for generation of germanium chloride, including acid type and concentration, effect of sodium chloride and extraction time, were investigated. Detection limits of 20 and 92 pg mL–1 and precisions of 18% (n=11) and 9.7% (n=11) were achieved for chloride and hydride generation, respectively, at a concentration of 10 ng mL–1. The generated germanium chloride and hydride species identities were characterized and confirmed as GeCl4 and GeH4 by use of electron-impact ionization mass spectrometry. Chloride generation coupled with SPME sampling and ICP–TOFMS detection resulted in twofold enhancement of sensitivity compared to GeH4 and detection limits for continuous hydride generation were 20-fold better than reported atomic fluorescence data.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for National Measurement Standards; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedNo
Identifier19834561
NRC number111
NPARC number5763556
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Record identifier40c5a33e-d7ad-4307-93cd-7004c5d7d595
Record created2009-03-29
Record modified2016-05-09
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