Manual on Physico-Chemical Strengthening of Freezing and Thawing Soils

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.4224/20359172
AuthorSearch for:
TypeTechnical Report
Series titleTechnical Translation (National Research Council Canada); Volume 1978
ISSN0077-5606
Physical description98 p.
SubjectPermafrost; Soils; frozen soils; frost penetration; settlement; freeze thaw cycles; foundation work; Sol; sol gele; penetration du gel; tassement; gel degel; travaux de fondation
AbstractSerious problems due to frost heaving and thaw settlement can be experienced by structures founded in seasonally and perennially frozen ground. Various design and construction techniques can be used to overcome or reduce the severity of these problems. One approach is to prepare and improve the properties of the foundation soil in advance of construction such that it is less susceptible to frost action and to settlement due to thawing. Much work has been done in the U. S.S.R. on this subject and this recently published manual is therefore of special interest in its studies of construction problems in permafrost areas. The manual describes electrical and chemical methods and techniques used in the Soviet Union for preconstruction preparation of seasonally and perennially frozen soils. The physical and mechanical properties of the foundation soil are improved by electrical thawing methods and/or injection of various chemicals followed by compaction of the soil, if required, before a structure is erected.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedNo
IdentifierNRC-TT-1978
NRC numberNRC-IRC-414
NPARC number20359172
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Record identifier4140e8ae-73b0-4a52-acf8-e364c7418ff0
Record created2012-07-20
Record modified2017-06-06
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