Epidemiological investigation and glycotyping of clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis by mass spectrometry : Association with multiple drug resistance

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.mimet.2008.10.008
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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Microbiological Methods
Volume76
Issue2
Pages204208; # of pages: 5
SubjectMass spectrometry; lipopolysaccharide; pseudomonas aeruginosa; drug resistance; cystic fibrosis; acid; acids; alginates; analysis; anti-bacterial agents; antigen; antigens; Canada; capillary; chemistry; complications; drug effects; drug resistance, bacterial; drug resistance, multiple; electrophoresis, capillary; epidemiology; etiology; glucuronic acid; hexuronic acids; humans; mass spectrometry; microbiology; multiple; o antigen; o antigens; o-antigen; pharmacology; pseudomonas; pseudomonas infections; pseudomonas-aeruginosa; structure
AbstractThe aim of the present investigation was to develop a novel approach for rapid identification and differentiation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa clones from Canadian cystic fibrosis patients by capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry. We screened P. aeruginosa isolates for lipopolysaccharide structure and presence/absence of alginate and correlated these findings with antibiotic resistance patterns.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); NRC Institute for Biological Sciences
Peer reviewedYes
NRC numberALTMAN2009
NPARC number15329305
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Record identifier41b44b02-18e7-4b23-a74b-47ddbb8cedf5
Record created2010-05-21
Record modified2016-05-09
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