Structure-borne sound transmission in rib-stiffened plate structures typical of wood frame buildings

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1260/1351010991501356
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleBuilding Acoustics
Volume6
IssueSeptember
Pages289308; # of pages: 20
SubjectSound transmission & insulation
AbstractStructure-borne sound transmission at a subfloor/joist connection typical of wood frame buildings is investigated experimentally and theoretically. The first part of this paper investigates the influence of the fastener spacing on the vibration attenuation across a joist. For this purpose, measurements were carried out on a small floor section for various coupling conditions of the joist. The experimental results suggested the existence of an effective coupling area characterizing the screwed joist/floor connection. In the second part of this study, a calculation model is developed based on Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) and plate strip theory for the idealized case of a rigid line connection. The presented model is verified experimentally on a Plexiglas structure and a subfloor/joist connection. The experimental validation showed fair agreement between measured and calculated data, but revealed that more work is required to improve the prediction accuracy in realistic situations.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
NoteErratum: "Structure-Borne Sound Transmission in Rib-stiffended Plate Structures Typical of Wood Frame Buildings". [J. Build. Acoust. 1999, 7(1), 75-76].
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number43674
9737
NPARC number20331227
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Record identifier42e84300-e010-4021-911e-7422cb6fca0c
Record created2012-07-18
Record modified2016-05-09
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