Laser shockwave technique for characterization of nuclear fuel plate interfaces

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1063/1.4789068
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TypeArticle
Proceedings titleReview of Progress in Qualitative Nondestructive Evaluation
Series titleAIP Conference Proceedings; Volume 1511
ConferenceThe 39th Annual Review Of Progress In Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation, 15–20 July 2012, Denver, Colorado, USA
ISSN1551-7616
ISBN978-0-7354-1130-2
Pages345352; # of pages: 8
SubjectLaser ultrasonics; Shock waves; Adhesion testing; Nuclear fuel plate
AbstractThe US National Nuclear Security Agency is tasked with minimizing the worldwide use of high-enriched uranium. One aspect of that effort is the conversion of research reactors to monolithic fuel plates of low-enriched uranium. The manufacturing process includes hot isostatic press bonding of an aluminum cladding to the fuel foil. The Laser Shockwave Technique (LST) is here evaluated for characterizing the interface strength of fuel plates using depleted Uranium/Mo foils. LST is a non-contact method that uses lasers for the generation and detection of large amplitude acoustic waves and is therefore well adapted to the quality assurance of this process. Preliminary results show a clear signature of well-bonded and debonded interfaces and the method is able to classify/rank the bond strength of fuel plates prepared under different HIP conditions.
Publication date
PublisherAIP
AIP
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationEnergy, Mining and Environment; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number53135
NPARC number21268447
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Record identifier42f4b5a6-9e51-4e38-95d3-975a12644ed8
Record created2013-07-19
Record modified2016-05-09
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