Effect of gelation conditions on gas separation performance for asymmetric polysulfone membranes

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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Membrane Science
Volume123
Issue1
Pages8994; # of pages: 6
SubjectPolysulfone membranes; Gas separations; Gelation; Permeation
AbstractAsymmetric gas separation membranes were prepared by the phase inversion technique under different gelation conditions from polysulfone/N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMAc) solutions. The dual bath method was employed to control the skin layer properties: the cast film was immersed in 2-propanol bath and water bath in sequence. The membranes were characterized by the permeance of oxygen and nitrogen gases and the observation with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A thin layer of silicone rubber (PDMS) was laminated on the surface of each asymmetric polysulfone membrane to eliminate the effect of defects in the skin layer. The oxygen permeance was inversely proportional to the square root of immersion time in the first (2-propanol) bath. The skin layer thickness determined by SEM observation increased with an increase in the immersion time in the first bath. For a given immersion time, the oxygen permeance decreased with an increase in the polymer concentration in the casting solution. Selectivity of oxygen over nitrogen also depended both on the immersion time in the first bath and the polymer concentration.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Institute for Chemical Process and Environmental Technology
Peer reviewedNo
NRC number37617
NPARC number14271980
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Record identifier45742c15-5981-4411-aa6c-71cf5cc3e839
Record created2010-02-04
Record modified2016-05-09
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