Influence of carbon coated pBN crucible on crystal growth of Cd0.9Zn0.1Te for radiation detector applications

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcrysgro.2012.03.034
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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Crystal Growth
ISSN00220248
Volume349
Issue1
Pages6167
SubjectGradient freeze technique; Impurities; Cadmium compounds; Nitrides
AbstractIn the Bridgman and Vertical Gradient Freeze (VGF) techniques, it is common to use a high purity crucible for crystal growth. One disadvantage of pBN crucibles is associated with the crucible material interacting with the melt during the growth cycle. Using pBN crucibles for the growth of CZT, we have observed that the crucible does in fact interact with the CZT melt. To prevent this interaction, a vacuum carbon coating system for applying a carbon coating to pBN crucibles has been developed. The effects of crucible use with time are studied, as are the compositional and device properties of the bulk material. GDMS measurements are used to investigate on broron and nitrogen content, among other trace impurities found in the crystal. Devices harvested from ingots grown using cc-pBN exhibit high resistivity and good functionality as room temperature gamma ray detectors.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationMeasurement Science and Standards; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
IdentifierS0022024812002242
NPARC number21268784
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Record identifier4585cba5-071e-40ed-8b2d-359ead00da5f
Record created2013-11-12
Record modified2016-05-09
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