Thermal degradation of cellulose and levoglucosan : the effect of inorganic stalts

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TypeArticle
Journal titleWood Science
ISSN0043-7700
Volume5
Issue1
Pages3843; # of pages: 6
Subjectcellulose; fire retardants; flame resistance; salts; flammability tests; produit de protection contre le feu; etancheite aux flammes; sel (chimie); essai d' inflammabilite
AbstractThe effects of eleven inorganic flame retardants on the flammability of cellulose have been investigated, and these flammability data were compared with the tar (levoglucosan) formation from the pyrolysis process. There was no correlation between the effectiveness of these flame retardants as determined by a minimum oxygen concentration flammability test at 1 percent treatment level and the amount of levoglocosan formed. This finding is contrary to the suggestions made by previous workers. A study of the pyrolysis of levoglucosan in the presence of potassium bromide (neutral), potassium carbonate (basic), and phosphoric acid (acidic) was made. Phosphoric acid had the most pronounced effect on the breakdown of levoglucosan; and carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, water, and residual char were among the major products. The data from the DP study indicate that both basic and acidic additives, soduim tetraborate decahydrate, and ammonium monohydrogen orthophosphate, accelerate the depolymerization in the early stages of the pyrolysis of cellulose.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
IdentifierDBR-RP-545
NRC number12906
3882
NPARC number20375762
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Record identifier45e7b5e8-aae4-44da-9509-5134a9898c96
Record created2012-07-23
Record modified2016-05-09
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