Bacterial community structure and soil properties of a subarctic tundra soil in Council, Alaska

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/1574-6941.12362
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TypeArticle
Journal titleFEMS Microbiology Ecology
ISSN0168-6496
Volume89
Issue2
Pages465475; # of pages: 11
Subjectbacterial RNA; carbon; nitrogen; RNA 16S; Actinobacteria; biomass; DNA sequence; genetics; microbiology; molecular genetics; molecular typing; pH; phylogeny; pyrosequencing; soil; soil microflora; tussock tundra; Alaska; soil bacteria; soil depth; Hydrogen-Ion Concentration; Molecular Sequence Data; Proteobacteria; RNA, Bacterial; Sequence Analysis, DNA; Soil Microbiology
AbstractThe subarctic region is highly responsive and vulnerable to climate change. Understanding the structure of subarctic soil microbial communities is essential for predicting the response of the subarctic soil environment to climate change. To determine the composition of the bacterial community and its relationship with soil properties, we investigated the bacterial community structure and properties of surface soil from the moist acidic tussock tundra in Council, Alaska. We collected 70 soil samples with 25-m intervals between sampling points from 0-10 cm to 10-20 cm depths. The bacterial community was analyzed by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes, and the following soil properties were analyzed: soil moisture content (MC), pH, total carbon (TC), total nitrogen (TN), and inorganic nitrogen (NH4+ and NO3-). The community compositions of the two different depths showed that Alphaproteobacteria decreased with soil depth. Among the soil properties measured, soil pH was the most significant factor correlating with bacterial community in both upper and lower-layer soils. Bacterial community similarity based on jackknifed unweighted unifrac distance showed greater similarity across horizontal layers than through the vertical depth. This study showed that soil depth and pH were the most important soil properties determining bacterial community structure of the subarctic tundra soil in Council, Alaska.
Publication date
PublisherOxford University Press
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21272654
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Record identifier4679cfc4-2dea-4100-a3b9-2701b9a91344
Record created2014-12-03
Record modified2016-05-09
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