Synthetic observations of the evolution of starless cores in a molecular cloud simulation: Comparisons with JCMT data and predictions for ALMA

Download
  1. Get@NRC: Synthetic observations of the evolution of starless cores in a molecular cloud simulation: Comparisons with JCMT data and predictions for ALMA (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1088/0004-637X/783/1/60
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleThe Astrophysical Journal
ISSN1538-4357
Volume783
Issue1
Article number60
AbstractInterpreting the nature of starless cores has been a prominent goal in star formation for many years. In order to characterize the evolutionary stages of these objects, we perform synthetic observations of a numerical simulation of a turbulent molecular cloud. We find that nearly all cores that we detect are associated with filaments and eventually form protostars. We conclude that observed starless cores that appear Jeans unstable are only marginally larger than their respective Jeans masses (within a factor of three). We note single dish observations such as those performed with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope appear to miss significant core structure on small scales because of beam averaging. Finally, we predict that interferometric observations with Atacama Large Millimeter Array Cycle 1 will resolve the important small-scale structure, which has so far been missed by millimeter wavelength observations. © 2014. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved..
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); NRC Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics (HIA-IHA)
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21272164
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifier47a11f8d-b679-42a0-a343-539cdddee838
Record created2014-07-23
Record modified2016-07-18
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)