Hyperosmotic pressure on HEK 293 cells during the growth phase, but not the production phase, improves adenovirus production

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.jbiotec.2011.11.016
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleHyperosmotic pressure on HEK 293 cells during the growth phase, but not the production phase, improves adenovirus production
ISSN0168-1656
Volume157
Issue1
Pages228236; # of pages: 9
Subjectadenovirus; osmolality; HEK 293 cells; culture media
AbstractHyperosmotic stress has been widely explored as a means of improving specific antibody productivity in mammalian cell cultures. In contrast, a decrease in cell-specific productivity of adenovirus production has been reported in several studies in which virus production in HEK 293 cell cultures was conducted under hyperosmotic conditions. However, production of viral vectors and, in particular, adenoviral vectors is the result of two consecutive phases: the growth phase and the virus production phase. In this study, the singular and combined effects of osmolality on the phases of cell growth and virus production were evaluated in culture media with osmolalities ranging from 250 to 410 mOsm. A two-factor, five-level full factorial design was used to investigate the effect of osmotic stress on cell physiology, as determined through the characterization of cell growth, cell metabolism, cell viability, cell cycle, cell RNA and total protein content, and total virus yield/cell-specific virus productivity. Overall, the results show that the growth of cells under hyperosmotic conditions induced favorable physiological states for viral production, and the specific virus productivity was improved by more than 11-fold when the medium's osmolality was increased from 250 to 410 mOsm during the cell growth phase. Both hypo- and hyperosmotic stresses in the virus production phase reduced virus productivity by as much as a factor of six. Optimal virus productivity was achieved by growing cells in media with an osmolality of 370 mOsm or greater, followed by a virus production phase at an osmolality of 290 mOsm. Compared to standard culture and production conditions in isotonic media, the shift from high to low osmolality between the two phases resulted in a two- to three-fold increase in virus yields. This hyperosmotic pressure effect on virus productivity was reproduced in five different commercial serum-free media.
Publication date
PublisherElsevier
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Biotechnology Research Institute; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number53187
NPARC number21268245
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Record identifier47e311fd-b2d2-41fc-bb70-9e2e669b251d
Record created2013-06-07
Record modified2016-05-09
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