Impact of intensive land-based fish culture in Qingdao, China, on the bacterial communities in surrounding marine waters and sediments

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1155/2011/487543
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TypeArticle
Journal titleEvidenced-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume2011
Pages487543-1487543-8
AbstractThe impact of intensive land-based fish culture in Qingdao, China, on the bacterial communities in surrounding marine environment was analyzed. Culture-based studies showed that the highest counts of heterotrophic, ammonium-oxidizing, nitrifying, and nitrate-reducing bacteria were found in fish ponds and the effluent channel, with lower counts in the adjacent marine area and the lowest counts in the samples taken from 500m off the effluent channel. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis was used to assess total bacterial diversity. Fewer bands were observed from the samples taken from near the effluent channel compared with more distant sediment samples, suggesting that excess nutrients from the aquaculture facility may be reducing the diversity of bacterial communities in nearby sediments. Phylogenetic analysis of the sequenced DGGE bands indicated that the bacteria community of fish-culture-associated environments was mainly composed of Flavobacteriaceae, gamma- and deltaproteobacteria, including genera Gelidibacter, Psychroserpen, Lacinutrix, and Croceimarina. Copyright © 2011 Qiufen Li et al.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Biotechnology Research Institute; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number53396
NPARC number19081506
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Record identifier481fb726-8bf1-42fb-80d8-987768572740
Record created2012-03-06
Record modified2016-05-09
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