Experimental verification of the theory of nuclear quadrupole relaxation in liquids over the entire range of molecular tumbling motion

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1021/jz200296g
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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Physical Chemistry Letters
Volume2
Issue9
Pages10201023; # of pages: 4
Subjectnuclear magnetic resonance; quadrupolar nuclei; relaxation; molecular motion; liquid
AbstractNuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of quadrupolar nuclei (I > 1/2) in liquids often consist of broad resonances, making it difficult to obtain useful chemical information. The poor NMR spectral resolution commonly observed for quadrupolar nuclei is a direct consequence of nuclear quadrupole relaxation processes. Although all key aspects of nuclear quadrupole relaxation processes have been known for decades within the framework of the Redfield relaxation theory, direct experimental NMR relaxation data that cover a wide range of molecular motion in liquids for quadrupolar nuclei are generally lacking. Here we report a complete set of experimental nuclear quadrupole relaxation data that are obtained for 17O, a half-integer quadrupolar nucleus, over the entire range of molecular motion within the limit of the Redfield theory. A general approach utilizing the quadrupole relaxation properties in the slow motion limit will be particularly beneficial for studies of quadrupolar nuclei in biomolecules of medium and large sizes.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number19734691
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Record identifier48d123e2-a5d1-4e54-ae06-ea15b92b2635
Record created2012-03-29
Record modified2016-05-09
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