Study of true stress-strain curve after necking for application in ductile fracture criteria in tube hydroforming of aerospace material

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.4028/www.scientific.net/KEM.504-506.95
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TypeArticle
Journal titleKey Engineering Materials
ISSN1013-9826
Volume504-506
Pages95100; # of pages: 6
SubjectWork hardening law; Material behaviour; Weighted average method; Diffuse necking
AbstractThe increased demand for weight reduction and manufacture of complex shapes with tube hydroforming (THF) requires more accurate material models to achieve highly reliable results from simulations. Conventional flow behaviours of materials implemented in commercial finite element (FE) software are not capable of describing accurately the material behaviour after localization. Utilization of the stress-strain data after necking can improve the quality of the FE analysis by employing realistic data for extrapolating the stress-strain curve. In this paper, the objective was to develop a simple tool that can determine the true stress-strain curve after necking in order to predict the material behaviour of aerospace alloys such as stainless steel 321 (SS321). Standard uniaxial tensile tests (ASME E8M-04) were performed to determine the true stress-strain before necking. A weighted-average method and a new hardening equation were proposed to extend the curve after necking.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationAerospace; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21276030
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Record identifier491d95a2-c344-4100-9118-0644c2b06219
Record created2015-09-15
Record modified2016-05-09
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