HPA and SAS responses to increasing core temperature during uncompensable exertional heat stress in trained and untrained males

Download
  1. Get@NRC: HPA and SAS responses to increasing core temperature during uncompensable exertional heat stress in trained and untrained males (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1007/s00421-009-1294-0
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleEuropean Journal of Applied Physiology
ISSN1439-6319
1439-6327
Volume108
Issue5
Pages987997
SubjectExertional heat stress; Gas chromatography–mass spectrometry; Hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis; Sympathetic-adrenomedullary system
AbstractIncreases in core temperature (T (c)) augment stress hormones and neurotransmitters; however, the effect of different T (c) tolerated with varying fitness levels during uncompensable exertional heat stress (EHS) is unclear. The purpose was to examine the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and sympathetic-adrenomedullary system (SAS) responses during uncompensable EHS in trained (TR) versus untrained (UT) males. Twelve TR and 11 UT (VO(2peak) = 70 +/-2 and 50 +/- 1 mL kg of lean body mass(-1) min(-1)) walked on a treadmill to exhaustion (EXH) in 40 degrees C (dry), dressed in protective clothing. PRE and 0.5 degrees C T (c) increments from 38.0-40.0 degrees C/EXH venous blood was obtained. Cortisol responded to absolute thermal strain, increasing throughout EHS and independent of fitness. Adrenocorticotropic Hormone, Norepinephrine, and Dehydroepiandrosterone-Sulphate responded to relative thermal strain with similar EXH values, despite higher T (c) tolerated for TR (39.7 degrees C) than UT (39.0 degrees C). Epinephrine, Growth Hormone (GH), and Aldosterone increased initially, with a plateau above 38.5 degrees C T (c). Findings demonstrate the complexity of the HPA axis, SAS, and T (c) relationship, with the stress pathways responding largely to relative thermal strain, although some hormones exhibited a clamping response likely as a protective mechanism. For the TR, evidence existed for a reduced pituitary sensitivity to glucocorticoids and the amplified GH may have contributed to their greater T (c) tolerated.
Publication date
PublisherSpringer
LanguageEnglish
Peer reviewedYes
NRC publication
This is a non-NRC publication

"Non-NRC publications" are publications authored by NRC employees prior to their employment by NRC.

NPARC number23001231
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifier499cd43d-6dcb-431b-87d1-69d88aba4164
Record created2017-01-09
Record modified2017-01-09
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)