Association between APOC1 polymorphism and alzheimer's disease: A case-control study and meta-analysis

Download
  1. Get@NRC: Association between APOC1 polymorphism and alzheimer's disease: A case-control study and meta-analysis (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0087017
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titlePLoS ONE
ISSN1932-6203
Volume9
Issue1
Article numbere87017
Subjectapolipoprotein C1; apolipoprotein E4; African American; aged; allele; Alzheimer disease; APOC1 gene; Asian; Caribbean Hispanic; Caucasian; controlled study; disease association; disease classification; disease course; disease predisposition; DNA polymorphism; ethnic group; gene insertion; genetic risk; genetic variability; heterozygote; pathogenesis; protein function; Asian Continental Ancestry Group; Case-Control Studies; European Continental Ancestry Group; Gene Frequency; Genetic Predisposition to Disease; Genotype; Hispanic Americans; Linear Models; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide; Risk Factors
AbstractBackground: Previous association studies examining the relationship between the APOC1 polymorphism and susceptibility to Alzheimer's disease (AD) have shown conflicting results, and it is not clear if an APOC1 variant acts as a genetic risk factor in AD etiology across multiple populations. Methods: To confirm the risk association between APOC1 and AD, we designed a case-control study and also performed a meta-analysis of previously published studies. Results: Seventy-nine patients with AD and one hundred fifty-six unrelated controls were included in case-control study. No association was found between the variation of APOC1 and AD in stage 1 of our study. However, our meta-analysis pooled a total of 2092 AD patients and 2685 controls. The APOC1 rs11568822 polymorphism was associated with increased AD risk in Caucasians, Asians and Caribbean Hispanics, but not in African Americans. APOE ε4 carriers harboring the APOC1 insertion allele, were more prevalent in AD patients than controls (χ2 = 119.46, OR = 2.79, 95% CI = 2.31-3.36, P<0.01). Conclusions: The APOC1 insertion allele, in combination with APOE ε4, likely serves as a potential risk factor for developing AD.
Publication date
PublisherPLOS
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; Human Health Therapeutics
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21272691
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifier4a0cf255-374b-4ae6-aec3-9dd475103685
Record created2014-12-03
Record modified2016-05-09
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)