Analysis of frailty and survival from late middle age in the Beijing Longitudinal Study of Aging

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2318-11-17
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TypeArticle
Journal titleBMC Geriatrics
ISSN1471-2318
Volume11
Article number17
Subjectaged; aging; article; China; cohort analysis; comparative study; demography; ethnology; female; follow up; frail elderly; human; longitudinal study; male; middle aged; psychological aspect; statistics; survival rate; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Aging; China; Cohort Studies; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Frail Elderly; Humans; Longitudinal Studies; Male; Middle Aged; Residence Characteristics; Statistics as Topic; Survival Rate
AbstractBackground: Frailty in individuals can be operationalized as the accumulation of health deficits, for which several trends have been observed in Western countries. Less is known about deficit accumulation in China, the country with the world's largest number of older adults. Methods. This study analyzed data from the Beijing Longitudinal Study of Aging, to evaluate the relationship between age and deficit accumulation in men and women and to evaluate the impact of frailty on mortality. Community dwelling people aged 55+ years at baseline (n = 3275) were followed every two to three years between 1992 and 2000, during which time 36% died. A Frailty Index was constructed using 35 deficits, drawn from a range of health problems, including symptoms, disabilities, disease, and psychological difficulties. Results: Most deficits increased the eight-year risk of death and were more lethal in men than in women, although women had a higher mean level of frailty (Frailty Index = 0.11 ± 0.10 for men, 0.14 ± 0.12 for women). The Frailty Index increased exponentially with age, with a similar rate in men and women (0.038 vs. 0.039; r > 0.949, P < 0.01). A dose-response relationship was observed as frailty increased. Conclusions: A Frailty Index employed in a Chinese sample, showed properties comparable with Western data, but deficit accumulation appeared to be more lethal than in the West. © 2011 Shi et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); NRC Institute for Biodiagnostics (IBD-IBD)
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21271471
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Record identifier4bbcb1fa-4345-4848-8bf5-171d41c5be71
Record created2014-03-24
Record modified2016-05-09
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