Solvent effects on redox properties of radical ions1

Download
  1. Get@NRC: Solvent effects on redox properties of radical ions1 (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1039/a809499c
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleJ. Chem. Soc., Perkin Trans. 2
Journal of the Chemical Society, Perkin Transactions 2
Volume2
Issue3
Pages425430; # of pages: 6
AbstractThe one-electron reduction potentials of the radical cations of 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO) and N,N,N[prime or minute],N[prime or minute]-tetramethylphenylene-1,4-diamine (TMPD) in propan-2-ol, ethanol, methanol, acetone, acetonitrile and dimethyl sulfoxide have been measured by cyclic voltammetry. Furthermore, the one-electron reduction potentials of 1,4-benzoquinone, 1,4-benzoquinone radical anion, methyl viologen dication and methyl viologen radical cation also have been measured in a number of solvents. The present results, together with previously published data on radical anions, have been used to evaluate solvent effects in view of the Kamlet-Taft relationship. The main factors affecting the magnitude of the solvent effects are the gas-phase redox properties of the corresponding neutral molecule (ionization potential and electron affinity) and the charge. In general, the magnitude of the solvent effects on solution redox properties of radical ions decreases with increasing redox stability of the radical ion, reflected by low ionization potential of the corresponding neutral molecule for radical cations and by high electron affinity of the corresponding molecule for radical anions.
Publication date
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences
Peer reviewedNo
NPARC number12327585
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifier4c7acaaa-a4bb-4be1-88c7-d01898104285
Record created2009-09-10
Record modified2016-05-09
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)