Determination of critical air velocities to prevent smoke backflow at a stair door opening on the fire floor - 660 RP

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AuthorSearch for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Applied Fire Science
ISSN1044-4300
Volume2
Issue1
Pages521; # of pages: 17
SubjectSmoke management; Indoor air
AbstractTests to determine air velocities to prevent smoke backflow were conducted in the ten-story experimental fire tower of the National Fire Laboratory of the National Research Council of Canada. They were measured at the stair door opening on the fire floor for bum temperatures ranging from 150°F (65°C) to 1200°F (650°C) at an increment of 150°F (8JDC). The critical velocities ranged from 124 feet per minute (ft/min) (0.63 m/s) at 150°F (65°C) to 460 ft/min (2.34 m/s) at 1200°F (650 C). Some of the other parameters investigated resulted in decreases in the critical air velocity. These included venting either by exterior wall vents or an exhaust fan, and opening stair doors in addition to the one on the fire floor. Reducing the angle of door opening from 90° to 30° decreased the effective critical air velocities, compared to those at an area of the door opening at 90°, by 50 percent. There was no noticeable effect on critical air velocities when the method of pressurization of the stairshaft was changed from multiple injection to bottom injection.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
IdentifierIRC-P-3278
NRC number36031
4343
NPARC number20358880
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Record identifier4dc88871-0bf1-40d8-b458-b8928ec5642b
Record created2012-07-20
Record modified2016-05-09
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