Relating centromeric topography in fixed human chromosomes to a-satellite DNA and CENP-B distribution

Download
  1. Get@NRC: Relating centromeric topography in fixed human chromosomes to a-satellite DNA and CENP-B distribution (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1159/000348744
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleCytogenetic and Genome Research
ISSN1424-859X
1424-8581
Volume139
Issue4
Pages234242
SubjectSatellite DNA; Atomic force microscopy; CENP-B; Centromere topography; Human metaphase chromosomes; Immuno-FISH
AbstractDespite extensive analyses on the centromere and its associated proteins, detailed studies of centromeric DNA structure have provided limited information about its topography in condensed chromatin. We have developed a method with correlative fluorescence light microscopy and atomic force microscopy that investigates the physical and structural organization of -satellite DNA sequences in the context of its associated protein, CENP-B, on human metaphase chromosome topography. Comparison of centromeric DNA and protein distribution patterns in fixed homologous chromosomes indicates that CENP-B and -satellite DNA are distributed distinctly from one another and relative to observed centromeric ridge topography. Our approach facilitates correlated studies of multiple chromatin components comprising higher-order structures of human metaphase chromosomes.
Publication date
PublisherKarger
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences; Measurement Science and Standards; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number23000597
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifier4e3b0687-e1b9-4502-b46f-4477bb138896
Record created2016-08-04
Record modified2016-08-04
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)
Date modified: