Distinguishing and grading human gliomas by IR spectroscopy

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/bip.10487
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TypeArticle
Journal titleBiopolymers
ISSN1097-0282
Volume72
Issue6
Pages464471; # of pages: 8
SubjectIR spectroscopy; brain tumors; grading; pattern recognition; classification; astrocytoma; glioblastoma
AbstractAs a molecular probe of tissue composition, IR spectroscopy can potentiallyserve as an adjunct to histopathology in detecting and diagnosing disease. This studydemonstrates that cancerous brain tissue (astrocytoma, glioblastoma) is distinguishable from control tissue on the basis of the IR spectra of thin tissue sections. It is furthershown that the IR spectra of astrocytoma and glioblastoma affected tissue can bediscriminated from one another, thus providing insight into the malignancy grade ofthe tissue. Both the spectra and the methods employed for their classification revealcharacteristic differences in tissue composition. In particular, the nature and relativeamounts of brain lipids, including both the gangliosides and phospholipids, appear to bealtered in cancerous compared to control tissue. Using a genetic classification approach,classification success rates of up to 89% accuracy were obtained, depending on thenumber of regions included in the model. The diagnostic potential and practical applications of IR spectroscopy in brain tumor diagnosis are discussed.
Publication date
PublisherWiley Periodicals, Inc.
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Institute for Biodiagnostics
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number2054
NPARC number9742357
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Record identifier4e66bc25-7201-4264-be7d-36d6b9880073
Record created2009-07-17
Record modified2016-08-16
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