Activation of Nanoparticles by Biosorption for E. coli Detection in Milk and Apple Juice

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1007/s12010-009-8709-6
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TypeArticle
Journal titleApplied Biochemistry and Biotechnology
Volume162
Issue2
Pages460475; # of pages: 16
SubjectContaminated milk and apple juice; Escherichia coli; Nanoparticles; Detection limit; Bacterial capture; Biosorption
AbstractTwo types of silver nanoparticles were activated by specific sorption of biomolecules for the detection of Escherichia coli. The capture of this bacterium was performed using polyclonal antibodies (anti-E. coli) biosorbed onto nanospheres or nanorice through a protein-A layer. The bacterial detection was achieved using surface enhancement Raman scattering in order to compare the performance of these two nanoparticles. The activated silver nanospheres showed a better performance mainly due to the dimension of these nanoparticles. The detection limit has been established using the automated Raman mapping system. The technique was capable of detecting 103 cells/mL in milk and apple juice without any pre-enrichment. With an overall assay time less than 1�h, the process could be easily adapted to detect other pathogens by selecting the pertinent antibody. Furthermore, PCR was used for the DNA verification to assess whether the selected bacterial strain was identical before and after detection. © 2009 Humana Press
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); NRC Biotechnology Research Institute
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number49991
NPARC number15651320
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Record identifier4f1d88d0-6565-41cf-9789-184d4de6de95
Record created2010-11-05
Record modified2016-05-09
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